Tag Archives: wearing

Take an Extra 20% Off Adidas Favorites This Weekend

I don’t know about you, but I’ve been wearing mostly athletic clothing these days — which is why I’m so excited about this sale. Adidas, which makes some of the best athletic apparel out there, is taking an extra 20% off sale items this weekend. Just use the code EXTRA20 at checkout to save big. To help you sift through everything they have on sale, we’ve rounded up some of our favorites.

Adilette Premium Slides: These are the perfect house shoes. Perfectly slip-on-and-off-able, the footbed is comfy enough to wear them around all day long.

Adilette Premium Slides

Down From $60

Tiro 19 Training Pants: Not quite sweats and not quite joggers, these training pants are a happy in between that will keep you comfy all day long, and can even be worn during workouts.

Tiro 19 Training Pants

Down From $45

Women’s UltraBoost 20 Shoes: The Ultraboost 20’s are some of the best running shoes out there right now. Not only are they extremely stylish, they offer support and stability for experienced runners and novices alike.

Women’s UltraBoost 20 Shoes

Down From $140

Don’t Rest Alphaskin Bra: Adidas makes some great basics and this sports bra is one of them. There are no pads, no fuss, and it features an easy pullover design as well.

Don’t Rest Alphaskin Bra

Scouted selects products independently and prices reflect what was available at the time of publish. Sign up for our newsletter for more recommendations and deals. Curious about a specific product or brand? Let us know! If you buy something from our posts, we may earn a small commission.


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Author: Daniel Modlin

Nancy Pelosi’s Impeachment Dress Makes a Dramatic Return

Outfit repeating—aka, what rich people call the fairly usual practice of wearing something more than once—is very fashionable. Cate Blanchett, Jane Fonda, and Tiffany Haddish have all endorsed the practice on the red carpet. The British tabloids lose their minds when Kate Middleton does it.

Today, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi just joined the club, while impeaching Donald Trump on one charge of “incitement of insurrection.”

Man in ‘Camp Auschwitz’ shirt, photographed at U.S. Capitol riot, arrested in Virginia

The man wearing a “Camp Auschwitz” shirt who was photographed at last week’s deadly pro-Trump riot at the U.S. Capitol, was arrested in Virginia on Wednesday, officials said.

Robert Keith Packer, a 56-year-old Newport News resident, was booked into Western Tidewater Regional Jail by the U.S. Marshals Service at 8:53 a.m., according to inmate records.

A man wears a
A man wears a

The FBI’s Norfolk Joint Terrorism Task Force “arrested Robert Keith Packer of Newport News and Douglas Allen Sweet of Grimstead, Virginia on federal charges related to their role in the events at the U.S. Capitol” last week, FBI spokeswoman Christina Pullen said in a statement.

During an initial appearance, Packer was told he was charged with two federal offenses: Knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted building and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds, according to an arrest warrant signed Tuesday by U.S. Magistrate Judge Robin Meriweather in Washington, D.C.

A criminal complaint written by FBI Special Agent Paul Fisher included two pictures of Packer allegedly at the riot, wearing the “Camp Auschwitz” shirt.

The agent also included another image of Packer, appearing to wear the same shirt, at a Newport News store on Dec. 11

A stakeout of Packer’s home on Monday showed he was driving the same car he used in that Dec. 11 store visit, Fisher wrote.

Packer was not asked to enter a plea before U.S. Magistrate Judge Douglas E. Miller, who said Packer would be released without bail. Packer was ordered to stay out of Washington, D.C., for anything but his case.

His next court date was set for Tuesday afternoon. Packer did not speak other than acknowledging his name and agreeing to terms of his release.

A bearded white man wearing a long-sleeved “Camp Auschwitz” sweatshirt was among the most striking images snapped at last week’s insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, when mobs incited by outgoing President Donald Trump stormed the building in hopes of overturning President-elect Joe Biden’s election victory.

Auschwitz was one the most notorious death camps run by Nazis during the Holocaust and World War II. Packer’s sweatshirt also includes the words “Work Brings Freedom,” in apparent homage to the German phrase “Arbeit macht frei” which was at emblazoned at the gates of Auschwitz and other death camps.

Sydney Cohen, a Hampton, Virginia resident, said Packer owns the vacant lot near her home. She said the man pictured in the “Camp Auschwitz” shirt and defendant’s mug shot listed in Western Tidewater Regional Jail records are the same person.

“I think seeing things on television is one thing, you can shake your head and be worried,” Cohen told NBC News on Wednesday. “But it’s a different feeling to have someone that you know personally to be involved (in the riots).”

Cohen said she shudders thinking about Packer possibly harboring anti-Semitic beliefs.

“He knows my name,” said Cohen, 53. “It’s a malice I didn’t know about and it’s scary.”

It wasn’t immediately clear if Packer had hired an attorney.


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Man wearing ‘Camp Auschwitz’ sweatshirt among those arrested for role in U.S. Capitol riots

By Sarah N. Lynch

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – A Virginia man who took part in the storming of the U.S. Capitol wearing a sweatshirt that said “Camp Auschwitz” is among a number of people arrested by the FBI over the assault, multiple media outlets reported on Tuesday.

Robert Keith Parker appeared in a virtual hearing in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia on charges of unlawful entry and violent entry and disorderly conduct.

Details of his arrest were still under seal at the time of his court appearance and he was released on his own recognizance.

Media outlets reported that Parker was the man shown in many photographs of last Wednesday’s assault on the Capitol wearing a sweatshirt emblazoned with the words “Camp Auschwitz”.

Auschwitz was the Nazi death camp where about 1.1 million people, most of them Jews, were killed in gas chambers or by other means during World War Two. The sweatshirt also bore a skull and cross bones and the words “Work Brings Freedom” – echoing the slogan in German over the gates at Auschwitz.

As of Tuesday afternoon, the Justice Department has brought at least 70 cases in connection with the riot at the Capitol, in which five people died as supporters of President Donald Trump stormed the building, scaled walls, and ransacked offices.

Many of those cases remain under seal, and a grand jury in Washington, D.C. has been convened to review possible charges.

Many of those who have been arrested were captured on video and in photos, with some bragging about their actions. The FBI has been scouring more than 100,000 images and videos as it tries to track down suspects.

Acting U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia Michael Sherwin said on Tuesday that while many of the people in custody were arrested on less serious charges, such as unlawful entry, he is expecting some offenders to face steeper charges.

Among the possible charges some people could face include seditious conspiracy or felony murder in connection with the death of a Capitol Police officer.

At least two other suspects tied to the events at the Capitol are due to make initial appearances in federal courts in New York on Wednesday, and another suspect who is already in custody for making threats towards House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Washington, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser will appear in federal court in Washington for a detention hearing.

(Reporting by Sarah N. Lynch; Editing by Angus MacSwan)


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Man seen wearing “Camp Auschwitz” shirt during Capitol riot arrested in Virginia

A man seen wearing a “Camp Auschwitz” sweatshirt during the U.S. Capitol riots last week has been arrested in Newport News, Virginia, a senior law enforcement official confirmed to CBS News.

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Robert Keith Packer

WTKR


Court records say Robert Keith Packer was arrested Wednesday by federal authorities in the Eastern District of Virginia on a warrant out of Washington, D.C. The arrest warrant says he’s facing federal charges of unlawfully entering a restricted area and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

The image of the shirt referencing the Nazi concentration camp drew widespread condemnation on social media. It was one of a number of anti-Semitic symbols and messages seen during the Capitol riots that experts view as part of a disturbing nationwide trend, reports The Associated Press.

Packer was being held at Western Tidewater Regional Jail in Suffolk, according to CBS station WTKR. He appeared virtually Wednesday before a federal magistrate judge, who ordered him released on personal recognizance bond. Packer’s release included the conditions that he attend a January 19 virtual hearing in District of Columbia federal court, and that he stay away from the District unless required to be there for court.

Packer told the judge he would retain his own attorney, but otherwise said little during the hearing. He said he had not seen a federal affidavit in support of the charges against him, which the judge ordered to be unsealed.

More than 70 people are already facing federal and local charges in the Jan. 6 assault that left five dead. Hundreds more charges are expected as federal investigators comb tips, video and social media to identify and arrest suspects across the country. Those already charged face a variety of counts including unlawful entry, disorderly conduct, theft, assault and weapons violations. A team of senior federal prosecutors are investigating more serious charges including sedition and conspiracy related to the “most heinous” acts at the Capitol, acting U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia Michael Sherwin said Tuesday.

Catherine Herridge and Clare Hymes contributed reporting.


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Man seen wearing “Camp Auschwitz” shirt during Capitol riot arrested in Virginia

A man seen wearing a “Camp Auschwitz” sweatshirt during the U.S. Capitol riots last week has been arrested in Newport News, Virginia, a senior law enforcement official confirms to CBS News.

packer.png
Robert Keith Packer

WTKR


Court records say Robert Keith Packer was arrested Wednesday by federal authorities in the Eastern District of Virginia on a warrant out of Washington, D.C. The arrest warrant says he’s facing federal charges of unlawfully entering a restricted area and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

The image of the shirt referencing the Nazi concentration camp drew widespread condemnation on social media. It was one of a series of anti-Semitic symbols and sentiment seen during the Capitol riots that experts see as part of a disturbing nationwide trend, reports the Associated Press.

Packer is being held at Western Tidewater Regional Jail in Suffolk, according to CBS station WTKR. He is expected to make a virtual court appearance Wednesday afternoon before a federal magistrate judge, according to court records.

More than 70 people are already facing federal and local charges in the Jan. 6 assault that left five dead. Hundreds more charges are expected as federal investigators comb tips, video and social media to identify and arrest suspects across the country. Those already charged face a variety of counts including unlawful entry, disorderly conduct, theft, assault and weapons violations. A team of senior federal prosecutors are investigating more serious charges including sedition and conspiracy related to the “most heinous” acts at the Capitol, acting U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia Michael Sherwin said Tuesday.

Catherine Herridge and Clare Hymes contributed reporting.


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‘Camp Auschwitz’ Hoodie Guy Arrested Over Capitol Riot

A rioter who stormed the U.S. Capitol last week wearing a sweatshirt with the phrase “Camp Auschwitz” on it has been arrested, according to media reports.

The individual, whom CNN identified as Robert Keith Packer, was arrested in Newport News, Virginia. CNN and CBS News first reported the arrest. Photos from the riot show Packer inside the Capitol wearing the sweatshirt that makes reference to the Nazi concentration camp in Poland where over 1 million people were killed during World War II. The bottom of the sweatshirt also said “Work brings freedom,” which is a translation of the phrase that was on concentration camp’s gates.

Packer is among dozens of rioters to be rounded up in the days since they storming the Capitol, including Richard Barnett, a self-described white nationalist from Arkansas who posed for gleeful photos in House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s office; Adam Johnson, a Florida stay-at-home dad who is caught in a photo smiling while absconding with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s lectern; and Jake Angeli, the shirt-less, horn-wearing Arizona resident known as the “QAnon Shaman.”

On Tuesday, a prominent Brooklyn judge’s son was arrested for stealing government property after he was pictured in the U.S. Capitol wearing fur pelts and a bulletproof vest with “POLICE” emblazoned across it, and carrying a plastic riot shield with Capitol Police insignia.

Five people died in connection with the riots, including a Capitol Police officer who was struck with a fire extinguisher by rioters.

U.S. Attorney for D.C., Michael Sherwin, said during a Tuesday press conference that charges have been filed in 70 cases related to the riots, and investigators have opened up more than 170 subject files. He added that, at the end of the investigation, he expects to file charges in hundreds of criminal cases.

“The scope and scale of this investigation are really unprecedented,” he said.

The top prosecutor added that his office is pursuing a “mind-blowing” spectrum of charges, from trespassing to theft of potential national defense information to felony murder. He said they’re also looking into “significant felony cases, including sedition and conspiracy.”


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Author: Pilar Melendez

China Signals Action to Block Critics From Hong Kong Elections

A pedestrian wearing a protective mask walks past a Chinese national flag displayed outside a hotel on National Day in Hong Kong, China, on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2020. Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam declared a return of stability, even as authorities deployed thousands of riot police and threats of arrests to deter protesters from returning to the streets in the Asian financial center. Photographer: Paul Yeung/Bloomberg
A pedestrian wearing a protective mask walks past a Chinese national flag displayed outside a hotel on National Day in Hong Kong, China, on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2020. Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam declared a return of stability, even as authorities deployed thousands of riot police and threats of arrests to deter protesters from returning to the streets in the Asian financial center. Photographer: Paul Yeung/Bloomberg (Paul Yeung/)

(Bloomberg) — Chinese state media urged action to keep Hong Kong elections from becoming a “tool for anti-China and trouble-making forces,” raising the prospects for more measures to curb dissent in the Asian financial hub.

The People’s Daily newspaper, the mouthpiece of the ruling Communist Party, said in a commentary Tuesday that those found to be disloyal must not be allowed to seek office. Action could come as soon as next week, with the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress — the body that imposed a controversial security law on Hong Kong last year — also announcing a surprise meeting starting Jan. 20.

“Hong Kong is an administrative region of China,” the People’s Daily said. “‘Those who love the country and love Hong Kong should rule Hong Kong, those who are anti-China and trouble makers are out’ is a principle and bottom line that Hong Kong elections must follow.”

The commentary suggests that China’s efforts to rein in an opposition that it blames for a wave of historic and sometimes violent protests in 2019 are far from over. Besides imposing the security law in June, authorities have barred numerous candidates from office, arrested several former lawmakers and delayed an election that was planned for September.

All opposition lawmakers resigned from the local Legislative Council in protest against the actions. Earlier this month, the new national security unit of the Hong Kong police arrested 55 people in connection with an unofficial primary to choose candidates for the delayed election, an incident cited by the People’s Daily commentary as a reason for action.

China’s actions have drawn international condemnation and the U.K. and U.S. have accused Beijing of breaking its treaty obligations to preserve liberal institutions, such as legislative elections, in the former British colony. The NPC Standing Committee meeting will start the same day as U.S. President-elect Joe Biden will be inaugurated as president on a platform to preserve democracies around the world.

China’s leaders are considering an overhaul of the election committee that selects Hong Kong’s chief executive, the South China Morning Post newspaper reported last month. Authorities were planning to reduce the already-limited influence democracy advocates wield on a panel controlled by pro-China loyalists, with candidates needing to be approved by Beijing, the newspaper said.

Hong Kong media outlets have also reported that China’s legislature could move to disqualify some pro-democracy district councilors, many of whom took office after a landslide 2019 victory following the landmark protests. Opposition politicians had once hoped to use that momentum to ride to a majority in the more important Legislative Council before elections were delayed for a full year, ostensibly due to coronavirus risks.

State media reports on the upcoming NPC meeting made no mention of Hong Kong, with a draft revision of a law on animal epidemic prevention on the agenda. Still, the body has previously announced debate on issues related to Hong Kong at the last minute, such as when it took up and approved the national security law behind closed doors, with no local debate.

More recently, the body ruled that Hong Kong’s government could expel Legislative Council lawmakers who were deemed insufficiently patriotic, a move that prompted the mass resignation of the remaining opposition members. There’s also a chance the committee could use next week’s meeting to clarify certain aspects of the national security law, which Hong Kong lawyers, foreign governments and human rights groups have called worryingly vague and open to interpretation.


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Author: Newsroom Infobae

NY Judge’s Son Pictured at Capitol Riot in Fur Pelts, Police Gear Is Arrested

A Brooklyn judge’s son, who was pictured at Wednesday’s attack on the U.S. Capitol wearing fur pelts and carrying police gear, was arrested by the FBI on Tuesday.

Aaron Mostofsky, the son of Kings County Supreme Court Judge Shlomo Mostofsky, was seen in multiple photos from the violent insurrection wearing the bizarre fur outfit and a bulletproof vest with “POLICE” emblazoned across it. He was carrying a wooden staff and a plastic riot shield with Capitol Police insignia.

A source with the knowledge of the case told The Daily Beast that Mostofsky was arrested early Tuesday at his brother’s house in Brooklyn. He will appear before a magistrate judge in the Eastern District of New York and is facing multiple charges, including felony theft of government property. ABC7, CNN and NBC first reported the arrest.

Mostofsky’s father is a well-known figure in the Orthodox Jewish community. In an interview with the New York Post last week, Mostofsky admitted he’d attended the event to protest a “stolen election.”

“We were cheated. I don’t think 75 million people voted for Trump—I think it was close to 85 million,” he said. “I think certain states that have been red for a long time turned blue and were stolen, like New York.”

His claims of millions of votes being flipped or suppressed has been disproven by dozens of courts and the federal Department of Justice. The last time New York State voted red was 1984.

David Greenfield, head of the Metropolitan Council on Jewish Poverty and a local powerbroker close to Judge Mostofsky, told The Daily Beast he believes “every single person that trespassed that day should be arrested.” He declined to comment specifically on Mostofsky’s arrest.

Chinese Court Sentences 10 Hong Kong Democracy Activists To Prison Terms

A woman wearing a protective face mask walks by the Government of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region office building in Beijing in June following the imposition of a national security law on Hong Kong. Ten Hong Kong fugitives were sentenced to prison Wednesday for illegally crossing international boundaries.

Andy Wong/AP


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Andy Wong/AP

A court on China’s mainland sentenced 10 Hong Kong pro-democracy activists to up to three years in prison Wednesday. In the closely watched case, the activists tried this summer to flee to Taiwan via speedboat — but they were intercepted at sea and detained in China.

The main charge against the group was that they sought to cross an international border illegally. But rather than return them to Hong Kong — where the police have deemed them fugitives — Chinese authorities opted to detain and prosecute the activists on the mainland.

The Yantian District People’s Court in Shenzhen imposed the toughest punishment on Tang Kai-yin and Quinn Moon, who were accused of organizing the trip. They are to serve three years and two years, respectively, along with a fine of up to around $3,000.

Eight other activists were ordered to spend seven months in prison and pay smaller fines. All of the sentences include the nearly four months the activists have already spent in custody, the South China Morning Post reports.

Two minors who were in the group of fugitives were returned to Hong Kong for trial, according to the South China Morning Post. The Global Times, a newspaper published by the Chinese Communist Party, said the trial would be closed to the public because of their age.

The sentencing comes after rights groups, the U.S. and other countries said China’s authorities had failed to ensure a fair legal process for the detainees, such as allowing them access to lawyers of their own choosing.

Most of the activists who fled were already facing criminal charges linked to pro-democracy street protests in Hong Kong, where Beijing has been tightening its control over the territory’s political and legal institutions. They left Hong Kong shortly after China’s central government imposed a tough new national security law on the territory.

The group who fled also includes two minors. Rather than being punished by the Chinese court, the pair on Wednesday were handed over to Hong Kong’s police, which said they face charges including arson.


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Author: Bill Chappell